The Answer You are Looking For

The Answer You are Looking For

As most of my readers know, I have been conducting test prep for almost four decades. Up until 2008, very few of my students ever thought about taking the ACT, nor would it occur to me to steer them toward that exam. So why was that? The SAT was the admissions exam of choice in the Northeast and West. Then somewhere around 2008, the more selective colleges and universities began to slowly accept both the ACT and the SAT.  Up until that point, students who lived in the Midwest and South took the ACT. The SAT was not even on their radar even though schools in those areas accepted both the ACT (or the SAT.) Why the new interest in the ACT? When the College Board changed the SAT in 2005 and ultimately made it longer than the ACT, students began looking at that test and realized that not only was it shorter, but it appeared much more straightforward and more relatable...
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The 13 Most Essential ACT Strategies

The 13 Most Essential ACT Strategies

Be an 'active' test taker; don't passively work through the exam. What does this mean? Write stuff down in your test booklet! Active test takers are more focused. The stronger the focus, the higher the score. Underline line references, but ALWAYS begin reading at the beginning of the paragraph so you have context. On the initial read through, go through the options, cross out only the 'stupid'. Any option you pause to consider, even if it's only for a nanosecond, is not 'stupid'. Not only should you bubble in your answer on the scantron, but also circle it in your test booklet. If you inadvertently skip a question and don't realize until after you've answered several questions, then it's easy to remedy. REMINDER: Double check to make sure you bubble in what you have circled in your test booklet. On the Reading, always PREVIEW: Underline what's important in the header, then read the first sentence of each paragraph as...
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