5 Types of Students ‘Who Don’t Test Well’ and Practical Solutions

5 Types of Students ‘Who Don’t Test Well’ and Practical Solutions

Why is it that so many strong students do not get ACT or SAT test scores that are commensurate with their performance at school?  Over the years. I have encountered this challenge with many students. Obviously, tutoring for the exams helps – in many cases, dramatically - but let’s understand what’s really going on when this is a frustrating reality for students: 1.Students approach studying for the exam the same way they approach studying for a school test. This can’t work, as the SAT math, for example, is not strictly a math test but an exam covering several areas and levels of APPLIED math concepts, in no particular order. SOLUTION: Students will come to understand the format of the exam by taking numerous practice tests. They then need to look at their mistakes and figure out where their thinking went ‘wrong’ that led to selecting the incorrect answer or ‘distractor’ and it’s officially labeled. Learning new strategies to read more critically and problem solve more methodically will...
Read More
Feel Pressed On the ACT Math and Science? No more!

Feel Pressed On the ACT Math and Science? No more!

When it comes to preparation for the SAT Math and the ACT Math and  Science, timed practice is crucial.  Unfortunately, most students  don't get nearly enough pacing practice before test day!  When getting  ready for the these tests, consider the following tips so that you don't fall behind the clock! 1. On section 3 of the SAT Math (the Non-Calculator section), students  have an average of a minute and fifteen seconds per question.  On  section 4 (the Calculator section), students will have a minute and a half per question. That isn't a lot of time! Remember:  TWO minutes is TOO much!  A student who has spent two minutes on a question is a student that needs to move ahead.  Ideally,  on the first pass of a section, students shouldn't spend more than one  minute per question. Also, they should decide within the first 15-20  seconds of reading a problem whether or not they want to commit to  that question. If they don't like it, move ahead! Exercise:  If you don't...
Read More