5 Myths About the SAT and ACT

5 Myths About the SAT and ACT

There is a lot of misinformation about the SAT and ACT. The same is true about test preparation. Below I dispel some of those myths and give you clarity about what you must know before you engage your teen in any test preparation: MYTH #1: Most colleges prefer the SAT over the ACT. FACT: ALL colleges place the same value on both exams. (See chart for correlations.) Some colleges that want Subject Tests, will even accept the ACT in lieu of the SAT + 2-3 Subject Tests, i.e. Amherst. Columbia, and Duke to name a few. MYTH #2: An exceptionally high test score is your teen’s #1 ticket to admission. FACT: A low score will keep a student out. Student’s scores should correlate with grades, but remember there are 7 components to the college application package – in usual order of importance. There are also at least 7 other lesser factors that can affect acceptance. GPA Test Scores Personal Statement Extracurricular Activities Recommendations Subject, AP and IB test Class...
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Debunking the 11 Most Common Scholarship Myths

Debunking the 11 Most Common Scholarship Myths

The following are the most common myths about obtaining a college scholarship followed by the facts: Only top students and gifted athletes get scholarships. FACT: There are many scholarships that do not use grades or athletic ability to determine eligibility. Some that do use grades may even consider a student with a 2.5 GPA, not necessarily a 4.0 as other criteria are considered more important – is your teen left- handed or is your teen the first in your family to attend college? FYI:  If your teen's test scores are significantly above the average of accepted freshmen, your student will be offered a merit scholarship. Depending how high the scores are reinforced by a high GPA, the scholarship can be partial or a full ride. Searching for scholarships should begin during your teen's senior year. FACT: You have a better chance of getting a scholarship if you begin earlier, even as early as freshmen year, though mid semester junior year may be the optimum...
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