The ‘Secret Sauce’ to Boost ACT or SAT Success

The ‘Secret Sauce’ to Boost ACT or SAT Success

So what is the 'secret sauce' for test taking success that enables students to improve test scores (and even grades in school) without a formal test prep program? Students who get in the habit of leisure reading for 10-15 minutes a day can significantly raise test their SAT or ACT scores. First, let’s get some history about the drop in test scores, better understand the positive effects of pleasure reading, and most importantly, learn about three approaches to get YOUR teen to read. Did you know that in 1972, 11.4% of students had verbal scores over 600?  Presently it’s 2-3%. Why the big drop? In 1972 their were no smartphones, i Pads, or PCs. No Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Obviously, the answer is very simple: Today students don’t 'have the time' to read for pleasure.  (Math scores dropped as well, though not as much due to the influx of Asian-American students taking the exam.) It's a proven fact that students who read daily for pleasure performed...
Read More
What You Need to Know If the ACT is Your Teen’s Better Test

What You Need to Know If the ACT is Your Teen’s Better Test

A lot of students find that the ACT is a much easier, more 'doable' test even though – and this is the biggest downside – they have to work through the exam at a much more rapid pace than they would on the SAT. Below I address 6 reasons why this is the case: The questions on the ACT are typically more straightforward than on the SAT. Also, the distractors (wrong choices) tend to be more obviously incorrect. Initially, students won't sense this, but with minimal practice, it becomes obvious for most students.   Raising scores on the SAT demands more understanding of strategies; on the ACT, scores can often be boosted merely by completing 4-6 practice tests. Bottom line, the ACT is not as strategy oriented.   The reading questions on the ACT are more about finding a specific answer within the passage whereas the SAT demands more critical analysis and the drawing of inferences.   Students are able to use a...
Read More