When and How to Find Out Your Teen’s SAT Scores

When and How to Find Out Your Teen’s SAT Scores

Since the new SAT was released in March, 2016 it has taken a lot longer for scores to come out. (The March test took almost two months!) The May 6, June 3, and August 26 exams will take almost four to six weeks to be released:  June 7, July 11, and September 15 respectively. But good news! Check out this recent post on the College Board website: New SAT Score Release Policies We’re making changes to help students and institutions get scores more quickly. Here’s what you need to know about the 2017-18 school year: October, November, December, March, and May from the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math sections will be released about two weeks after test day. Students will receive emails when those multiple-choice scores are ready. Students who take the SAT with Essay will get those scores five days after their multiple-choice scores become available. After students receive all their scores, you’ll see their reports in the K–12 portal...
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Feel Pressed On the ACT Math and Science? No more!

Feel Pressed On the ACT Math and Science? No more!

When it comes to preparation for the SAT Math and the ACT Math and  Science, timed practice is crucial.  Unfortunately, most students  don't get nearly enough pacing practice before test day!  When getting  ready for the these tests, consider the following tips so that you don't fall behind the clock! 1. On section 3 of the SAT Math (the Non-Calculator section), students  have an average of a minute and fifteen seconds per question.  On  section 4 (the Calculator section), students will have a minute and a half per question. That isn't a lot of time! Remember:  TWO minutes is TOO much!  A student who has spent two minutes on a question is a student that needs to move ahead.  Ideally,  on the first pass of a section, students shouldn't spend more than one  minute per question. Also, they should decide within the first 15-20  seconds of reading a problem whether or not they want to commit to  that question. If they don't like it, move ahead! Exercise:  If you don't...
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